The Violent Crime Reduction Act and Plug Fire Cap Guns

Applies to UK Rentals Only, overseas sales are unaffected

 

Your are required to read this section before proceeding to hire our Prop weapons (PFC or Replica weapons).  If in doubt contact your local police force and explain why, when and where you intend to use a replica or PFC prop.

 

Plug Fire Guns

 

Plug fire cap guns are classified as Realistic Imitation Firearms and as such are covered by the 2007 VCRA, (with the exception of pre 1870 design models, see pre 1870 section below).

 

These items are functioning replica model guns for use in films and by re-enactment / skirmish groups with the appropriate liability insurance only. They do not fire any projectile nor can they be converted to do so, they are in fact designed to comply with the strict Japanese laws which prevent ownership of firearms. Plug fire cap guns are 100% legal to own in the UK given correct entitlement under the VCRA.

 

The defence for their sale / purchase is:

 

Section 37 of the VCRA provides various defences to the new offence. It makes it a defence to show that the manufacture, importation, sale or modification was only for the purpose of making the realistic imitation firearm available for:


*     A museum or gallery.
*     Theatrical performances and rehearsals of such performances.
*     The production of films and television programmes.
*     The organisation and holding of historical re-enactments.
*     Airsoft Site members, UKARA.
*     Crown servants. (purchases for the Crown, by the Crown only)

 

 

Plug Fire Gun Accessories
 

Accessories for Plug Fire Cap Guns are not covered by the VCRA and as such may be bought by anyone over the age of 18.

 

Pre 1870 Design Plug Fire Guns

 

Plug fire cap guns of a type pre-dating 1870 are not covered by the VCRA and as such may be bought by anyone over the age of 18.

This is particularly useful for western re-enactors, please use the general enquiries form to tell us your requirements, we can source a number of pre 1870 designs, again please use enquiries form to request more details.

 

BloodyStuff supports the VCRA and as such abides strictly to it.

 

If there are any questions please contact us on the contact page for clarification.

 

 

 

UK-LAW : VCRA

 

Please note this information is only relevant for sales/hire to people in the U.K:

 

From 01st October 2007 a new law was introduced in the U.K (VCR-Act) restricting sales of all types of replica guns (but not banning them or making them illegal).

You can purchase as per normal for film, theatre T.V, living history or if you are registered with a re-enactment group (other exemptions exist from the new law, please read on)

Purchases of replica guns for re-enactors and for film, theatrical performances, or rehearsals and for skirmishing are permitted and confirmed so by the Home Office.

Other exemptions also include for use in museum, galleries and for public displays.   

Replicas that are at least 51% in a bright colour specified as either red, purple, orange, pink and yellow are exempt from the new UK laws. Therefore, if you do not fall within the above categories then you can still purchase a replica but 51% of it will have to be painted in a bright colour as indicated above.   (we can make 51% your replica a bright colour if you do not fall within the above categories - Please ask).  The reason behind bright colour is because the replica goes from being a Realistic Imitation Firearm (RIF) to a imitation firearm (in bright colour) which is exempt from the VCRA laws.  You have to be over 18yrs old to purchase/own. No replica would be sold to anyone under 18 years old.  

If you are registered with an insured skirmishing group you are also exempt and can also purchase under the new laws. Proof of exemption has to be provided.

In order to purchase under the new laws you will have to confirm you are registered with a re-enactment group or living history group / skirmishing group or the purchase is for film / theatre or re-enacting purposes. This could be done via your re-enactment/living history membership card, your UKARA registered, letter from film/TV company.   If you cannot provide proof of your defence then 51% of the replica would have to be painted in a bright colour (as specified in the UK-VCRA) in order to make it a imitation firearm. We offer a painting service for people who do not have a defence.

To clarify:
Ownership and use of replica guns will remain unaffected after 01st October 2007.
Anyone who purchased before or after 01st October 2007 will be able to continue to own, use their replica guns as per normal within the law.
Exemptions in the new law allows sales to film, theatre purposes (for example rehearsals) and to re-enactors meaning collectors in general may be joining re-enactment groups or confirming use of replica guns is for film or theatre use.  Also exempt :  for purposes of museum, galleries and public displays.    
There is no mention in the VCR Bill that re-enactors are limited to era specific replica guns
Replicas that are 51% in a bright colours specified as either in red, pink, purple orange and yellow are exempt from the new UK laws.  This is because the realistic imitation firearm (RIF) goes to being a Imitation Firearm.
Replicas with a design and mechanism of a sort first dating before 1870 are also exempt from the new UK laws  (S.A.A. .45's are exempt)  Please see our Wild-West page.
Parts / Accessories unaffected (PFC caps, cartridges, mags...ect..)
Both before and after the new laws introduced modelguns are 100% legal in the UK

Additional (extracts taken from the Home Office site and various other government sites):

Realistic Imitation Firearms Exemptions from the VCRA:

Defences applicable:

• the organisation and holding of permitted activities for which public liability insurance is held in relation to liabilities to third parties arising from or in connection with the organisation and holding of those activities;

• the purposes of display at a "permitted event", which means a commercial event at which realistic imitation firearms are offered for sale or displayed, this relates to certain exhibition events and arms

fairs;

• the purposes of a museum or gallery;

• the purposes of theatrical performances or rehearsals;

• the production of films or television programmes;

• the organisation or holding of historical re-enactments;

• the purposes of functions that a person has in his capacity as a person in the service of Her Majesty

Exemptions:
- a museum or gallery
- theatrical performances and rehearsals of such performances;
- the production of films and television programmes;   
- the organisation and holding of historical re-enactments   

"museum or gallery" includes institutions which are open to the public and whose purpose includes the preservation, display and interpretation of material of historical, artistic or scientific interest. (B) And gives the public access to it.

Historical re-enactment is defined as "any presentation or other event held for the purpose of re-enacting an event from the past or of illustrating conduct from a particular time or period in the past". This is intended to include a range of re-enactment activities, including the display of military vehicles at shows and presentations to school children by war veterans.

"Imitation Firearms" are exempt from the VCRA.

What distinguishes an imitation from a realistic imitation firearm?

An ‘imitation firearm’ is regarded to be unrealistic if it is made of transparent material or

has a principal colour of:

• bright red 

• bright orange 

• bright yellow 

• bright green 

• bright pink 

• bright purple 

• bright blue 

Note: ‘Principal colour’ means that the bright colour has to be foremost regardless of how many colours the imitation has. So, for instance, if the imitation has two colours, the bright colour must cover at least 51% of the gun in order to conform to the regulations

like the images below :

The regulations also prescribe dimensions that distinguish between ‘imitation’ and ‘realistic imitation firearms’. Imitation firearms are not deemed to be realistic if they measure less than 38mm in height and 70mm in length (regardless of colour); they are simply imitations and may be sold freely to persons aged 18 or over..

Note: It is an offence to modify an imitation firearm so that it becomes a realistic imitation firearm, i.e. to remove the colouring or enhance its appearance in any way to resemble a real firearm.

The actual law can be found here : http://www.legislation.gov.uk/ukpga/2006/38/part/2

Section : 36s

37Specific defences applying to the offence under s. 36E+W+S

(1)It shall be a defence for a person charged with an offence under section 36 in respect of any conduct to show that the conduct was for the purpose only of making the imitation firearm in question available for one or more of the purposes specified in subsection (2).

(2)Those purposes are—

(a)the purposes of a museum or gallery;

(b)the purposes of theatrical performances and of rehearsals for such performances;

(c)the production of films (within the meaning of Part 1 of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988 (c. 48)_see section 5B of that Act);

(d)the production of television programmes (within the meaning of the Communications Act 2003 (c. 21)_see section 405(1) of that Act);

(e)the organisation and holding of historical re-enactments organised and held by persons specified or described for the purposes of this section by regulations made by the Secretary of State;

(f)the purposes of functions that a person has in his capacity as a person in the service of Her Majesty.

(3)It shall also be a defence for a person charged with an offence under section 36 in respect of conduct falling within subsection (1)(d) of that section to show that the conduct—

(a)was in the course of carrying on any trade or business; and

(b)was for the purpose of making the imitation firearm in question available to be modified in a way which would result in its ceasing to be a realistic imitation firearm.

(4)For the purposes of this section a person shall be taken to have shown a matter specified in subsection (1) or (3) if—

(a)sufficient evidence of that matter is adduced to raise an issue with respect to it; and

(b)the contrary is not proved beyond a reasonable doubt.

(5)The power of the Secretary of State to make regulations under this section shall be exercisable by statutory instrument subject to annulment in pursuance of a resolution of either House of Parliament.

(6)That power includes power—

(a)to make different provision for different cases;

(b)to make provision subject to such exemptions and exceptions as the Secretary of State thinks fit; and

(c)to make such incidental, supplemental, consequential and transitional provision as he thinks fit.

(7)In this section—

         “historical re-enactment” means any presentation or other event held for the purpose of re-enacting an event from the past or of illustrating conduct from a particular time or period in the past; 

        “museum or gallery” includes any institution which— 

(a)  has as its purpose, or one of its purposes, the preservation, display and interpretation of material of historical, artistic or scientific interest; and 

 

(b)  gives the public access to it